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Have your say on eprivateclient's Global Wealth Management Centres Survey

19/05/2017 News Team

eprivateclient's Global Wealth Management Centres Survey remains open for professionals to let us know which jurisdictions they do business with and why.

The results of the survey will be used in the publication of a new series of Global Wealth Management Centres Indices, which will reveal how private client professionals from a range of disciplines rate the world's most important wealth management jurisdictions.
 
The jurisdictions in the survey are Bermuda, BVI, Cayman Islands, Dubai, Dublin, Guernsey, Hong Kong, Isle of Man, Jersey, Luxembourg, Singapore, Switzerland, UK and US.
 
Professionals, including (but not limited to) private client lawyers, private client accountants, trustees and private bankers, are asked what factors they rate most highly in a wealth management jurisdiction and also what elements of wealth management they believe each jurisdiction excels in.
 
They are asked to rate jurisdictions on a series of factors including quality of legislation, the range of structures available, the range of wealth management services available, taxation, privacy and more.
 
The annual survey will also track sentiment amongst private client professionals, asking how the level of work they conduct via each jurisdiction has fared in the past year, as well as their expectations for the year ahead. It will also look at whether they expect their firm to grow in the year ahead, as well as their top concerns.
 
The survey will create the definitive guide to the global private wealth management community’s opinions on the world's leading wealth management jurisdictions. The results will be available on eprivateclient with more targeted results exclusively available in its annual jurisdiction reports.
 
If you would like to be amongst the first to take part in this important and innovative survey please click here.

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